Why a boys’ school?

As specialists in boys’ education, we understand the unique ways in which boys learn and grow. Nevertheless, when considering the value of single-gender education, you’re sure to ask these questions: Why a boys’ school? What are boys’ unique learning needs? Will my son miss out on social contact with girls?
As specialists in boys’ education, we understand the unique ways in which boys learn and grow. Nevertheless, when considering the value of single-gender education, you’re sure to ask these questions: Why a boys’ school? What are boys’ unique learning needs? Will my son miss out on social contact with girls?

UCC is a leader in the field of boys’ education — regularly updating and enhancing our approaches to better meet boys’ needs at every age and stage of their development. Our teachers know how to engage boys and challenge them academically.

Understanding boys

Clearly, all boys are not the same, but brain research confirms that boys and girls tend to learn and develop differently. This means that single-sex education allows boys to learn and thrive in harmony with their unique learning and emotional needs.

National and international research also shows a trend of boys’ declining achievement in school, relative to girls’ achievement. Increasingly, parents and educators are reassessing research findings that boys and girls develop and learn differently. (See “Celebrating Boys' Boyness,” in The Globe and Mail, updated May 1, 2018.) At UCC, we recognize that boys are active and they learn best in an environment that understands their unique learning needs. For example, we recognize that boys are often naturally competitive, physical in nature, and inclined toward competitive sports. So, we give them opportunities to have plain old fun on house teams or flex their skills on top-tier competitive teams.

We allow our boys to move while learning — in many classrooms, we provide flexible setups and exercise balls as a seating option.

UCC’s environment frees boys from stereotyping and allows them to focus their energies on school work and building good relationships with others. Boys tend to be problem-solvers, and in a boys’ school they find a comfort level that allows them to ask questions without embarrassment. We also give them a safe space to embrace creative pursuits, not just science and math.

We also provide hands-on activities that let them apply their learning and we accept that boys are more comfortable writing about actions than feelings.

The list of examples goes on and on. And it’s our job to keep pace with the research we enthusiastically apply in the classroom and beyond.

UCC is a leading member of the International Boys’ School Coalition and the Toronto Boys’ School Coalition. These school partnerships share their knowledge and experience and are committed to the best practices in boys’ education.

Working alongside girls

Our students won’t spend their lives in a boys-only environment. Likewise, they won’t learn in an isolated male environment — nor will they establish a boys-only mindset at UCC.

We know how important it is for our students to interact with girls. So, whether it’s a co-ed theatre production, participation in debating, the World Affairs Conference or Coalition of Single Sex Schools of Toronto (COSSOT) events, our boys have a wealth of opportunities to work alongside the students of local girls’ schools.

Through their regular adviser meetings, our students discuss issues related to gender equality and respect for others. In addition, our many female faculty, advisers, staff and senior administrators play key roles in fostering positive, respectful attitudes towards women.

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